Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus)

THE NORTHWEST PASSAGE – KANGERLUSSUAQ to NOME

from $38,800$34,920

DATE: AUGUST 21-SEPTEMBER 14, 2020 

DURATION: 25 DAYS/24 NIGHTS

EMBARK: KANGERLUSSUAQ, GREENLAND

DISEMBARK: NOME, ALASKA

SHIP: Silver Cloud 

FROM: $34,920*

*After 10% Early Booking Savings

Limited Time – Free Economy or Reduced Rate Business Class Airfare.

Pre- and Post-Cruise tours are available.

 

All about the THE NORTHWEST PASSAGE – KANGERLUSSUAQ to NOME.

Join us for some vitamin sea and head to the High Canadian Arctic. Follow the routes of Frobisher, Hudson et al and cross from Greenland to Alaska, experiencing the unforgettable in between. Encounter a fascinating mix of local culture, endemic wildlife and show stopping landscapes before deep diving into the history, geology, wildlife and botany of this spectacular area with our superb Expedition Team.

Join us for a journey that heads up to the High Canadian Arctic, following the route of several explorers that had looked for the Northwest Passage. During our crossing from Greenland to Alaska we will experience the beauty of fjords and crystal clear glaciers. We will visit small towns and villages to encounter a fascinating mix of local and Danish or Canadian culture and will reach emblematic sites of Franklin’s and Amundsen’s attempts to sail through the Northwest Passage. We will also be looking for polar bears, musk oxen, seals, narwhals and walrus. Throughout the voyage, learn about the history, geology, wildlife and botany of this spectacular area from lecture presentations offered by your knowledgeable on-board Expedition Team.

 

Voyage Highlights:

Ilulissat, Greenland – 
Ilulissat has the Icefjord, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, right next to the town. The area offers spectacular views of the many icebergs ready to head into the Atlantic.

Uummannaq, Greenland – 
In the iceberg-laden waters surrounding the remote community of Uummannaq it is common to see whales. The island is known for its huge basalt mountain, and a small hunting and fishing village rests at the foot of the heart-shaped Uummannaq Mountain. A walking tour of Uummannaq will permit to see the granite church, the small museum and will show how village life revolves around the halibut/fish-processing factory.

Pond Inlet, Nunavut, Canada – 
Located on the northeastern shore of Baffin Island, Pond Inlet is across from Bylot Island. The region’s numerous archaeological sites and artefacts indicate that it was inhabited long ago by the Thule.

The following places are all extremely weather and ice dependent:

Beechey Island, Nunavut, Canada – 
Beechey Island is best known as the location where the Franklin expedition spent its first winter (1845-46) and, subsequently, where search parties found the grave sites of three of Franklin’s men. We intend to go ashore to see the three weathered wooden grave markers and visit the memorial to Franklin and his men.

Gjøa Haven, Nunavut, Canada –
During his attempt to cross the Northwest Passage, Amundsen had remained at a small natural harbor that he named after his famous ship Gjøa, Gjøa Haven. It is the only settlement on King William Island.

Cambridge Bay, Nunavut, Canada – 
Cambridge Bay was visited by Amundsen in Gjøa during his famous and successful attempt to cross the Northwest Passage and later with his second ship Maud. Like some of the other settlements in the Canadian High Arctic, the locals are good carvers and various types of artwork can be seen.

Smoking Hills, Cape Bathurst, Northwest Territories, Canada –
The cliffs of Cape Bathurst had already been seen by Franklin during one of his earlier expeditions. The cliffs contain oil shale and have apparently been burning for centuries. We intend to do a Zodiac cruise to get closer to the cliffs.

 

Kayaking – 
Weather permitting, the Silver Cloud offers the opportunity to kayak in a small group under the guidance of certified kayak instructors. These special expeditionary excursions allow you to experience the wilds of Greenland and Nunavut in a peaceful silence.

 

Cultural Highlights:

  • Visit towns in Greenland and the Canadian Arctic to see how the Inuit live in current day.
  • Follow the tracks of famous explorers.

 

Wildlife Watch List:

  • Humpback whales, bowhead whales, beluga whales, narwhal and orcas
  • Musk oxen, reindeer/caribou, Arctic hares, polar bears, seals and walrus
  • Seabirds of note: Glaucous Gull, Common Gull, Great Black-backed Gull, Arctic Tern, Black-legged Kittiwakes
  • Land birds: Ravens, White Wagtail, Common Redpoll, Lapland Bunting, Lapland Longspur, Northern Wheatear, Red-throated Diver, Purple Sandpiper

 

Expedition highlights and wildlife listed here are possible experiences only and cannot be guaranteed. Your Expedition Leader and Captain will work together to ensure opportunities for adventure and exploration are the best possible, taking into account the prevailing weather, wildlife activity and ice conditions. Expedition Team members scheduled for this voyage are subject to change or cancellation.

 

The tour package inclusions and exclusions at a glance
What is included in this tour?Items that are included in the cost of tour price.
  • All meals
  • Beverages, open bar, beer, wine, liquor
  • Room service
  • Butler service
  • All excursions
  • Expedition leaders and guest speakers
  • Gratuities to ship crew.
  • Port charges and taxes

Whats not included in this tour.Items that are not included in the cost of tour price.

Pre- and Post-cruise tours

Travel Insurance

Air Fare (Unless Free Air is available)

  1. Day 1 KANGERLUSSUAQ, GREENLAND - EMBARK

    Plan to arrive a day early, because you sure don’t want to miss this boat due to a flight delay!

    Kangerlussuaq is a settlement in western Greenland in the Qeqqata municipality located at the head of the fjord of the same name (Danish: Søndre Strømfjord). It is Greenland’s main air transport hub and the site of Greenland’s largest commercial airport. The airport dates from American settlement during and after World War II, when the site was known as Bluie West-8 and Sondrestrom Air Base. The Kangerlussuaq area is also home to Greenland’s most diverse terrestrial fauna, including muskoxen, caribou, and gyrfalcons. The settlement’s economy and population of 512 is almost entirely reliant on the airport and tourist industry.

    DEPART 5:30 PM.

     

  2. Day 2 SISIMIUT, GREENLAND

    Located just north of the Arctic Circle, Sisimiut is the northernmost town in Greenland where the port remains free of ice in the winter. Yet it is also the southernmost town where there is enough snow and ice to drive a dogsled in winter and spring. In Sisimiut, travelling by sled has been the primary means of winter transportation for centuries. In fact, the area has been inhabited for approximately 4,500 years. Modern Sisimiut is the largest business center in the north of Greenland, and is one of the fastest growing Greenlandic cities. Commercial fishing is the lead economy in the town‘s thriving industrial base.

  3. Day 3 ILULISSAT, GREENLAND

    Known as the birthplace of icebergs, the Ilulissat Icefjord produces nearly 20 million tons of ice each day. In fact, the word Ilulissat means “icebergs” in the Kalaallisut language. The town of Ilulissat is known for its long periods of calm and settled weather, but the climate tends to be cold due to its proximity to the fjord. Approximately 4,500 people live in Ilulissat, the third-largest town in Greenland after Nuuk and Sisimiut. Some people here estimate that there are nearly as many sled dogs as human beings living in the town that also boasts a local history museum located in the former home of Greenlandic folk hero and famed polar explorer Knud Rasmussen.

  4. Day 4 UUMMANNAQ, GREENLAND

    In the iceberg-laden waters surrounding the remote community of Uummannaq it is common to see whales. This area of Greenland is also known for its huge basalt mountains, and the small hunting and fishing village of Uummannaq rests at the foot of the heart-shaped Uummannaq Mountain, a name that translates to mean “in the shape of a seal’s heart”. The town of over 1200 people has a granite church and the country’s most northerly ferry terminal. The economy of Uummannaq revolves largely around the halibut/fish-processing factory.

     

     

     

     

  5. Day 5 DAY AT SEA
    Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.

    Northeast of Qaqortoq and at the end of a fjord, Hvalsey is one of the best examples of South Greenland’s many scattered ruins from the Norse period. Today the area is used for sheep-grazing, but until the 15th century the settlement at Hvalsey, and specifically Hvalsey’s church, played an important part. Christianity had spread its influence throughout Europe and eventually had reached remote Greenland, where it established itself in the country in 1000 AD. Hvalsey Church was built in the 14th century and is the best preserved of the churches in Greenland from that period. Apart from the church walls, historical ruins from the time of the Norse are just a few meters away.

     

     

  6. DAY 6 CAPE YORK, GREENLAND

    Visit the arctic seascape of Cape York, Greenland. Located on the northwestern coast of Greenland in Baffin Bay, Cape York is an important geographical feature delimiting the Melville Bay at its northwestern end and Kiatassuaq Island at its other end. There is a chain of coastal islands that stretches between the two capes, most notably Meteorite Island, named for the discovery one of the world’s largest iron meteorites in Savissivik, a settlement on the island. The iron from this meteorite attracted Inuit migrating from Arctic Canada who used the metal in making tools and harpoons. Visitors to this region will see iconic drifting blue-white icebergs that are shrinking as the earth temperature rises.

     

     

  7. DAY 7 POND INLET, CANADA

    Located in northern Baffin Island, Pond Inlet is a small, predominantly Inuit community, with a population of roughly 1,500 inhabitants. In 1818, the British explorer John Ross named a bay in the vicinity after the English astronomer John Pond. Today Pond Inlet is considered one of Canada’s ”jewels of the North” thanks to several picturesque glaciers and mountain ranges nearby. Many archaeological sites of ancient Dorset and Thule peoples can be found near Pond Inlet. The Inuit hunted caribou, ringed and harp seals, fish, polar bears, walrus, narwhals, geese, ptarmigans and Arctic hares, long before European and American whalers came here to harvest bowhead whales. Pond Inlet is also known as a major center of Inuit art, especially the printmaking and stone carving that are featured in the town’s art galleries.

  8. DAY 8 DUNDAS HARBOR, DEVON ISLAND, CANADA

    Dundas Harbor is located in the southeast of Devon Island, Canada’s 6th largest island. It is a forlorn but starkly beautiful spot. The island was first sighted by Europeans in 1616 by the English explorers Robert Bylot and William Baffin. But it did not appear on maps until after explorer William Edward Parry’s exploration in the 1820’s. Parry named it after Devon, England. In the local Inuktitut language, the place is called Talluruti, which translates as “a woman’s chin with tattoos on it.” This refers to the deep crevasses and streaks on Devon Island, which from a distance resemble traditional facial tattoos. On land there are remains of a Thule settlement dating back to 1000 A.D., including tent rings, middens and a grave site. There are also much more recent remains a Royal Canadian Mounted Police outpost. Today, Devon Island is the largest uninhabited island in the world.

  9. DAY 9 RADSTOCK BAY – BEECHY ISLAND, CANADA

    The Thule culture had already settled there many centuries before, and left behind qarmat homes, made of rocks, whale bones, rock and sod walls, and skins for roofs that tell a story of over 800 years of human habitation. Other striking finds in this area are the many fossils of corals, crinoids and nautiloids that can be seen. Just across Lancaster Sound is Prince Leopold Island, a Canadian Important Bird Area, a federally listed migratory bird sanctuary, and a Key Migratory Bird Terrestrial Habitat site with large numbers of Thick-billed Murres, Northern Fulmars and Black-legged Kittiwakes that breed there.

     

    Beechey Island is a small island off the southwest coast of Devon Island, separated by a narrow waterway called the Barrow Strait. Captain William Edward Parry was the first European to visit the island in 1819. His lieutenant, Frederick William Beechey, named the island after his father, the artist William Beechey (1753–1839). Beechey Island played a significant role in the history of Arctic Exploration. During the winter of 1845-46, Sir John Franklin and his men camped on the island as part of their ill-fated quest to find the Northwest Passage. Mummified remains of three of Franklin’s crew were discovered, giving a better understanding of what happened before the disappearance of the expedition. In 1850 Edward Belcher used the island as a base while surveying the area. Later, in 1903, Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen stopped at the island at the beginning of his successful voyage in search for the Northwest Passage.

  10. DAY 10 RESOLUTE, NUVANUT, CANADA

    Resolute, or Resolute Bay, is one of Canada’s northernmost communities and is second only to Grise Fiord on Ellesmere Island. It is also one of the coldest inhabited places in the world, with an average yearly temperature of −15.7 °C (3.7 °F).

     

  11. DAY 11 CRUISE PEEL SOUND, CANADA

    Peel Sound is a 30 mile wide, 125 mile long channel separating Prince of Wales Island to the west and Somerset Island to the east. It was named in 1851 by explorer Vice Admiral Horatio Austin in honour of Sir Robert Peel, a former prime minister of Great Britain. Austin, however, was not the first person to sail through the sound. Five years earlier, in 1846, Sir John Franklin had passed through the strait, just before his ships became icebound. Peel Sound is not always open. Several explorers, including Francis Leopold McClintock in 1858 and Allen Young in 1875, were unable to pass because it was blocked by ice.

  12. DAY 12 GJOA HAVEN, NUVANUT, CANADA

    In 1903, the Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen had entered the area on his ship Gjøa in an expedition intending to travel through the Northwest Passage. By October the straits through which he was travelling began to ice up. Amundsen put Gjøa into a natural harbor on the southeast coast of King William Island. He stayed there, in what Amundsen called ”the finest little harbor in the world”, for nearly two years. He and his crew spent much of that time with the local Netsilik Inuit, learning from them the skills to live off the land and travel efficiently in the Arctic environment. This knowledge proved to be vital for Amundsen’s later successful exploration to the South Pole. He explored the Boothia Peninsula, searching for the exact location of the North Magnetic Pole.

     

     

  13. DAY 13 JENNY LIND ISLAND, CANADA

    Named for the Swedish opera singer. Jenny Lind Island is a Canadian Important Bird Area, and a Key Migratory Terrestrial Bird Site. Notable bird species include Canada goose, lesser snow goose, and Ross’s goose.

    Muskoxen are found in the south east section of the island.

  14. DAY 14 CAMBRIDGE BAY, NUNAVUT, CANADA

    Cambridge Bay is the largest stop for passenger and research vessels traversing the Arctic Ocean’s Northwest Passage, a disputed area which the Government of Canada claims are Canadian Internal Waters, while other nations state they are either territorial waters or international waters.

  15. DAY 15 CRUISE DEASE STRAIT, CANADA
  16. DAY 16 CRUISE AMUNDSEN TROUGH, CANADA

     

     

     

  17. DAY 17 SACHS HARBOR, NORTHWEST TERRITORIES, CANADA

    Sachs Harbour is a hamlet located in the Inuvik Region of the Northwest Territories, Canada. Situated on the southwestern coast of Banks Island in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region, the population according to the 2011 census count was 103 people.

     

  18. DAY 18 SMOKING HILLS, NORTHWEST TERRITORIES, CANADA

    The Smoking Hills are located on the east coast of Cape Bathurst in Canada’s Northwest Territories, next to the Arctic Ocean and a small group of lakes. The cliffs were named by explorer John Franklin, who was the first European to see them on his 1826 expeditions. They contain strata of hydrocarbons (oil shale), which have been burning continuously for centuries.

  19. DAY 19 CRUISE BEAUFORT SEA

    Named after Sir Francis Beaufort, the British naval officer whose observation of the wind and sea state resulted in the Beaufort scale, the Beaufort Sea is part of the Arctic Ocean north of Alaska and the Canadian Yukon and Northwest Territories. The Beaufort Sea is frozen for most of the year, only opening a channel near the Canadian and Alaskan shore during the months of August and September, the best time for a transit through the Northwest Passage. Beluga and bowhead whales, seals and polar bears are part of the Beaufort Sea’s wildlife.

  20. DAY 20 HERSCHEL ISLAND, YUKON TERRITORY, CANADA

    Herschel Island is an island in the Beaufort Sea (part of the Arctic Ocean), which lies 5 km (3.1 mi) off the coast of Yukon in Canada. It is Yukon’s only offshore island

  21. DAY 21 DAY AT SEA

    Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.

  22. DAY 22 BARROW, ALASKA, USA

    Barrow is one of the northernmost public communities in the world and is the northernmost city in the United States. Nearby Point Barrow is the country’s northernmost point, and the northernmost point of the entire American mainland landmass that begins at the very southernmost tip of South America. To go any further north, you would either have to venture into the icy expanse of the Arctic Ocean.

     

  23. DAY 23 DAY AT SEA
    Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
  24. DAY 24 DAY AT SEA
    Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
  25. DAY 25 NOME, ALASKA, USA - DISEMBARK

    You will be transferred to the airport for your flight home.

SILVER CLOUD

After extensive refurbishment, Silver Cloud is the most spacious and comfortable ice class vessel in expedition cruising. Her large suites, her destination itineraries and her unparalleled service make her truly special. Her four dining options will tantalize your taste buds and as 80% of her suites include a veranda, watching a breaching whale or a few cavorting penguins has never been so personal. Broad sweeping decks with multiple open spaces and a swimming pool complete what is surely the most distinctive expedition ship sailing today. A limited number of guests in polar waters, mean that Silver Cloud has the highest space to guest and crew to guest ratios in expedition cruising. With her 16 zodiacs, 10 kayaks, possibilities are almost limitless with ship-wide simultaneous explorations. Finally, a team of up to 22 passionate and dedicated expedition experts are always at hand to ensure your voyage is enhanced every step of the way.

GUESTS: 254
CREW: 223
LENGTH: 514.14 Feet / 156.7 Meters

SUITES

Silversea’s oceanview suites are some of the most spacious in cruising, and all include the services of a butler. Select your suite and Request a Quote – guests who book early are rewarded with the best fares and ability to select their desired suite.

Owner’s Suite
This stylish apartment offers the superlative in levels of space, comfort and service on board. A perfect mix of expedition experience with luxury lifestyle. Available as a one-bedroom configuration or as two bedroom by adjoining with a Vista Suite.

Grand Suite
Expertly designed and exquisitely appointed. The ideal space for sharing stories with fellow explorers and new friends. With enough space to roam both in and outside, this suite is perfect relaxing and recounting the highlights of your day. Available as a one-bedroom configuration or as two-bedroom by adjoining with a Veranda Suite.

Royal Suite
Stately. Commanding and majestic. Perfect for relaxing after a days’ exploring and looking through your photos. With lectures being streamed live to your room, this is the pinnacle of good living at sea. Available as a one-bedroom configuration or as two-bedroom by adjoining with a Veranda Suite.

Silver Suite
Stylish and sophisticated with larger verandas, excellent for taking pictures and bird-watching. Situated midship, this suite is perfection in design and comfortable living. A huge walk in wardrobe, a beautiful marbled bathroom and a spacious living area completes the picture. Silver Suites accommodate three guests.

Medallion Suite
With a room configuration that favors watching the sun rise from the comfort of your bed and losing yourself in the mesmerizing seascapes, this suite is the perfect answer to adventure cruising. A large walk-in wardrobe, and an expansive living make the Medallion Suite a your home away from home on the high seas. Medallion Suites accommodate three guests.

Deluxe Veranda Suite
A Silversea signature, with a preferred central location, the Veranda Suite is spacious and welcoming.Floor-to-ceiling glass doors open onto a furnished private teak veranda from where you can contemplate anything from the midnight sun to an antarctic sunrise. The Deluxe Veranda Suite offers preferred central location with identical accommodation to a Veranda Suite.

Veranda Suite
A Silversea signature, the Veranda Suite is spacious and welcoming. Floor-to-ceiling glass doors open onto a furnished private teak veranda from where you can contemplate anything from the midnight sun to an antarctic sunrise. Some Veranda Suites accommodate three guests (Suites going from 505 to 510, and from 605 to 610).

Vista Suite
Your home away from home while you embrace the intrepid explorer within. The suite’s seating area has plenty of room to relax while you go over your notes, ready for the next adventure. Large picture windows frame panoramic ocean views, ideal for appraising the local wildlife.

RESTAURANTS

Discover our collection of onboard venues where you’ll enjoy spending time with like-minded travellers and of course, our personalized all-inclusive service.