Splendors of Alaska

from $9,900

DATES: June 30 – July 12, 2019

 DURATION: 13 DAYS/12 NIGHTS

EMBARK: SEWARD, ALASKA

DISEMBARK: VANCOUVER, BC

SHIP: SILVER EXPLORER

 

All about the Splendors of Alaska.

From searching for the tiny hummingbird to the mighty Bald Eagle, a wide and varied program is promised. Expert lecturers take you on thrilling excursions to show you the remarkable wildlife, indigenous cultures and magnificent landscapes of these remote lands. As mighty glaciers rise up from the frigid waters and Orcas breach for your camera, experience an Alaskan adventure as never before.

Join us to sail from Seward, Alaska to Vancouver, British Columbia to experience the dynamic culture and natural splendour this region has to offer. Cruise past the six mile-wide Hubbard Glacier and through the labyrinth of incredible fjords. See the totem poles of Metlakatla and learn of the Tsimshian and Tlingit indigenous cultures. Tour the Tongass National Forest and seek out wildlife by land and sea. Nature lovers will delight not just in sweeping mountain- and fjord- views, but also in sightings of Bald Eagles, brown and black bears, humpback and orca whales, and shy harbor seals. Throughout the voyage, learn about the history, geology, wildlife and botany of these locations from lecture presentations offered by your knowledgeable onboard Expedition Team.

Voyage Highlights:

College Fjord, Alaska, US – 
Cruise College Fjord in Alaska to visit glaciers named after Ivy League colleges. The frozen rivers of ice were named in 1899 by two professors from Harvard University and Amherst College after their Ivy League alma maters and sister schools. College Fjord offers idyllic views of snow-capped mountains and narrow waterways studded with blue-white icebergs.

Hubbard Glacier, Alaska, US – 
Cruise along Hubbard Glacier, off the coast of Yakutat, Alaska, the largest glacier in North America, with a calving front that is more than six miles wide. This glacier has been very active, with two major surges forward in 1986 and again in 2002.

Petersburg, Alaska, US – 
Known as “Little Norway” Petersburg is one of Alaska’s major fishing communities. Although the Tlingit and other indigenous groups had been in this area for centuries, the Norwegian Peter Buschmann started the first cannery and attracted more immigrants from Scandinavia so that a permanent town evolved. One can enjoy strolling through this community at leisure. Petersburg is also the starting point for an excursion by local boats heading for LeConte Bay and the LeConte Glacier, North America’s southernmost tidewater glacier. To reach the glacier one has to pass snow covered peaks that rise out of the fjord to heights of more than 4,000 feet. It is surrounded by the Tongass National Forest, the largest national forest in the US with 17 million acres of protected land. This massive reserve holds the largest Pacific temperate rainforest.

Metlakatla, Alaska, US – 
The Tsimshian are the indigenous people of Metlakatla, a small ocean-front community in southern Alaska. The settlement holds at least a dozen ornate and emblematic Totem Poles for which the Tsimshian are famous. The people here respect and pay homage to their ancestors with traditional dance performances and ceremonies at their longhouse, the community’s heart and soul.

Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada – 
Nanaimo on Vancouver Island is the territory of indigenous Snuneymuxw people. They are the keepers of an ancient culture dating back over 5,000 years. This region and people are part of the Coast Salish grouping of linguistically and ethnically related tribes of the Pacific Northwest. The dynamic Coast Salish culture reflects beliefs and values based upon the interconnectedness and spirit of all things.

Cultural Highlights:
• Visit Metlakatla, home of the indigenous Tsimshian people, famous for their emblematic Totem Poles.
• Observe native cultural presentations and ceremonies.
• Learn about the unique Coast Salish culture and values through a cultural presentation by the Snuneymuxw indigenous people in Nanaimo.

Wildlife Watch List:
• Bald Eagle, Steller’s Jay, Golden-crowned Kinglet, Common Raven, Barn Swallow, Belted Kingfisher, Northwestern Crow, Great Blue Heron, Marbled Murrelet, Pigeon Guillemot; Common, Bonaparte’s, Mew and Glaucous-winged Gulls
• Brown and black bears
• Humpback whales, orcas, harbor seals

Please note: Expedition highlights and wildlife listed here are possible experiences only and cannot be guaranteed. Your Expedition Leader and Captain will work together to ensure opportunities for adventure and exploration are the best possible, taking into account the prevailing weather, wildlife activity and ice conditions. Expedition Team members scheduled for this voyage are subject to change or cancellation.

 

The tour package inclusions and exclusions at a glance
What is included in this tour?Items that are included in the cost of tour price.
  • Highly qualified expedition team with experts in their field (marine biologists, ornithologists, historians and more)
  • Excursions and activities, including explorations by Zodiac®
  • Complimentary expedition gear
  • Personalized service with a butler for all suites and the highest crew to guest ratio in the industry
  • Fine dining even in the most remote places of the planet
  • Comfortable amenities with the largest expedition suites at sea
  • Inclusive room-service, select wines, spirits and soft drinks throughout the ship
  • Free WIFI throughout the ship
  • Onboard Gratuities
  • Exclusive partnership with The Royal Geographical Society

Whats not included in this tour.Items that are not included in the cost of tour price.
  • Travel Insurance
  • Air fare – Unless included
  • Items of personal nature
  • Spa Services

  1. Day 1 Arrive Anchorage,Alaska

    Arrive Anchorage and transfer to your included hotel. Remainder of  day is free.

  2. Day 2 Seward, Alaska - Embarkation

    Transfer from Anchorage to Seward – Embarkation. Departure 5:00 PM.

    It is hard to believe that a place as beautiful as Seward exists. Surrounded on all sides by Kenai Fjords National Park, Chugach National Forest, and Resurrection Bay, Seward offers all the quaint realities of a small railroad town with the bonus of jaw-dropping scenery. This little town of about 2,750 citizens was founded in 1903, when survey crews arrived at the ice-free port and began planning a railroad to the Interior. Since its inception, Seward has relied heavily on tourism and commercial fishing. It is also the launching point for excursions into Kenai Fjords National Park, where it is quite common to see marine life and calving glaciers.

  3. Day 3 College Fjord - Prince William Sound

    College Fjord in the northern sector of Prince William Sound is considered one of the most scenic fjords in the world with spectacular glacier viewing. There are over a dozen major glaciers in the fjord, all surrounded by rugged snow-capped mountains. It is possible from one point to see eight glaciers at once. College Fjord was discovered in 1899 during the Harriman Expedition. Edward Henry Harriman, a millionaire railroad tycoon, set sail with his family, a few select friends, inviting a group of scientist, artist and photographers, including 23 esteemed scientists from several Ivy League schools, to explore the fjords of Alaska. Including packers and hunters and the crew of 65, the total amount of people on the ship came to 126. The scientists named the glaciers in this fjord after their Ivy League alma maters and their sister schools. Those names include Amherst, Barnard, Bryn Mawr, Harvard, Smith, Vassar, and Yale. The glaciers of the northwest side feature names of women’s colleges and those of the southeast side are names of men’s colleges.

  4. Day 4 Cape St. Elias - Kayak Island

    Cape St Elias is the southwest end of Kayak Island in the Gulf of Alaska. It is separated from the mainland by a channel 4 miles wide. The island, named by Lt. Sarichef of the Russian Navy in 1826 because its outline resembles the shape of an Eskimo skin canoe, is 20 miles long and only 2 miles wide and covered in dense rainforest. The cape itself was named by Russian explorer Vitus Bering on July 20, 1741 in honour of St. Elias, whose saint’s day is July 20. The lighthouse, located at the southernmost tip, is a National Historic Landmark. It was built in 1916, and has been automated since 1974. It has been, and continues to be, an indispensable navigational aid along the shipping lanes from the contiguous American states and South-eastern Alaska to Cordova, Valdez, Seward, and Anchorage.

  5. Day 5 Hubbard Glacier

    Hubbard Glacier, off the coast of Yakutat, Alaska, is the largest glacier in North America, with a calving front that is more than six miles wide. One of the main sources for Hubbard Glacier originates 76 mi inland. It has been a very active glacier, experiencing two major surges in the past 30 years. This glacier was named after Gardiner Greene Hubbard, a U.S. lawyer, financier, and philanthropist. He was the first president of the National Geographic Society.

  6. Day 6 Elfin Cove - Point Adolphus, Alaska

    Elfin Cove sits snugly on the southern shore of Cross Sound, which leads in eastwards to the Inside Passage. Northwards and across the Sound from the small community lies Glacier Bay National Park and the Fairweather Mountain range. Elfin Cove is a quaint little harbor clustered with attractive timber houses built into the wooded hillsides on stilts. The population swells to about 200 during the summer months, from a rather meager 6 or so during the snowy and isolated winters. Its commercial hub consists of a Post Office, mini-Museum, a General Store, the Coho Bar and numerous sports fishing businesses. In the summer months Rufous-backed Hummingbirds visit feeders scattered around the community.

    During the evening Silver Explorer will be near Point Adolphus, a well-known area for whale watching. Enjoy an aperitif while you are on the outer decks, looking for humpback whales as well as orcas, or simply enjoying the landscape.

  7. Day 7 Sergius Narrows - Sitka, Alaska

    Sergius Narrows passage is used by small vessels to traverse from the open Pacific Ocean to the Alaskan Inside Passage. It is notoriously difficult to navigate due to raging currents and whirlpools. All vessels wait until slack tide when the currents are at their slowest to start manoeuvring. The narrow passage, less than 100 meters wide in places, wanders through heavily forested steep hills of the Tongass National Forest.

    It’s hard not to like Sitka, with its eclectic blend of Alaska Native, Russian, and American history and its dramatic and beautiful open-ocean setting. This is one of the best Inside Passage towns to explore on foot, with such sights as St. Michael’s Cathedral, Sheldon Jackson Museum, Castle Hill, Sitka National Historical Park, and the Alaska Raptor Center topping the town’s must-see list. Sitka was home to the Kiksádi clan of the Tlingit people for centuries prior to the 18th-century arrival of the Russians under the direction of territorial governor Alexander Baranof, who believed the region was ideal for the fur trade. The governor also coveted the Sitka site for its beauty, mild climate, and economic potential; in the island’s massive timber forests he saw raw materials for shipbuilding. Its location offered trading routes as far west as Asia and as far south as California and Hawaii. In 1799 Baranof built St.Michael Archangel—a wooden fort and trading post 6 miles north of the present town. Strong disagreements arose shortly after the settlement. The Tlingits attacked the settlers and burned their buildings in 1802. Baranof, however, was away in Kodiak at the time. He returned in 1804 with a formidable force—including shipboard cannons—and attacked the Tlingits at their fort near Indian River, site of the present-day 105-acre Sitka National Historical Park, forcing many of them north to Chichagof Island. By 1821 the Tlingits had reached an accord with the Russians, who were happy to benefit from the tribe’s hunting skills. Under Baranof and succeeding managers, the Russian-American Company and the town prospered, becoming known as the Paris of the Pacific. The community built a major shipbuilding and repair facility, sawmills, and forges, and even initiated an ice industry, shipping blocks of ice from nearby Swan Lake to the booming San Francisco market. The settlement that was the site of the 1802 conflict is now called Old Sitka. It is a state park and listed as a National Historic Landmark. The town declined after its 1867 transfer from Russia to the United States, but it became prosperous again during World War II, when it served as a base for the U.S. effort to drive the Japanese from the Aleutian Islands. Today its most important industries are fishing, government, and tourism.

  8. Day 8 Sail Island - Endicott Arm

    Sail Island is one of the many small, narrow islands located in Frederick Sound, in the Inside Passage of Alaska. It is home to the largest of all sea lions, the Steller sea lions, and they are often seen hauled out on the rocky shores, lazing around in the sun. The waters surrounding Sail Island are well known as a place where the magnificent humpback whales congregate to feed.

    Endicott Arm is a long fjord branching off Stephen’s Passage, the major inner passage heading southeast from Juneau. The easternmost tip of Endicott Arm nearly reaches the Canadian border. Like all the fords in this region, it was carved by glaciers during the last Ice Age which ended about 11,000 years ago. One either side of the fjord the steep, nearly vertical walls, rise to a height of about 370 meters or 1,200 feet. Sitka spruce and western hemlock trees manage to cling onto the rock faces, adding to the breath-taking beauty of the landscape.

  9. Day 9 Petersburg - Wrangell Narrows, Alaska

    Petersburg lies on the northern end of Mitkof Island, in the Inside Passage, on the banks of Frederick Sound where it joins the Wrangell Narrows. It is halfway between Juneau, 120 mi to the north, and Ketchikan 110 mi to the south. Remnants of fish traps and ancient petroglyphs indicate that this area was used by the Tlingit people as a summer fish camp for more than 1,000 years. In 1897 Peter Buschmann, a Norwegian immigrant, settled here. The place was named Petersburg after him, and was incorporated as a town in 1910. It flourished as a fishing port, and even today, it remains an island community that makes its living from the sea. It is the largest home-based halibut fleet in Alaska, and is ranked the 15th-most lucrative fisheries port in the United States by volume.

    The Wrangell Narrows is one of the most scenic and well-known ‘Narrows’ in Alaska. It is a winding 22 mile (35 km) long channel between Mitlof Island and Kupreanof Island in Southeast Alaska. There are about 60 lights and buoys to mark it because of its navigation hazards. It was originally named in 1838 by G. Lindenberg to honour Admiral Baron Ferdinand Petrovich von Wrangell, a Baltic German explorer who was the chief manager of the Russian-American Company and governor of the Russian settlements in Alaska. For the past 150 years it has been a principal marine thoroughfare to Alaska from the lower 48 and Canada, and today is used by fishing boats and Alaska Marine Highway ferries.

  10. Day 10 Metlakatla, Alaska

    Since the late 19th century, Metlakatla has been the major settlement of the Metlakatla Indian Community of the federally recognized Annette Islands Reserve, the only remaining reservation in Alaska. It is located on Annette Island, and in 2010 had 1,405 residents. Membership in the community is primarily by lineage and is comprised primarily of Tsimshian people. Metlakatla comes from a Tsimshian word meaning ”Salt Water Passage.” In 1886, William Duncan, an English tannery employee and lay member of the Church Missionary Society, along with a devoted group of Tsimshian followers, decided to leave his home village in British Colombia. Duncan went to Washington, D.C., asked the U.S. government to give his group land in Alaska. The U.S. gave them Annette Island after a Tsimshian search committee in seagoing canoes discovered its calm bay, accessible beaches and abundant fish. The group arrived in 1887 and built a settlement laid out in a grid pattern like a European town. They named the town New Metlakatla, after the town they had left behind, but later dropped the ”New.”

  11. Day 11 Cruise the Inside Passage

    If it is drama that you are after, then you certainly need look no further that the dramatic beauty of the Inside Passage. With isolated communities nestling in shoreside villages, mountains rising from the tidal waters, seals basking on ice floes and massive glaciers calving with a thunderous snap in the distance, this stretch of water is quite unique. Named after early explorers who were looking for the Northwest Passage (found much further north), cruising the Inside Passage has become a must for any sailing aficionado. Perhaps it is the massive – and advancing – glaciers that look like they have been sculpted by Mother Nature herself that is the draw; or maybe it is the calm waters that are protected from the otherwise enervated Pacific. Or it could be it is the plethora of wildlife that can be spotted above and below the water that will stay with you forever.

  12. Day 12 Nanaimo, Canada
    7913 - Seward to Vancouver
    Nanaimo (British Columbia)
    Canada
    THURSDAY 11 JUL
    10:00 AM – 11:30 PM
    Nanaimo is located on the east coast of Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canada, about 70.2 miles (113 kilometres) northwest of Victoria and 34.1 miles (55 kilometres) west of Vancouver. The ’Harbour City’ of Nanaimo is separated by the Strait of Georgia, and linked to Vancouver via the Horseshoe Bay BC Ferries terminal in West Vancouver. As the site of the main ferry terminal, Nanaimo is the gateway to many other destinations both on the northern part of the island, such as Tofino, Comox Valley, Parksville, Campbell River, Port Alberni, and Rathtrevor Beach Provincial Park. Offshore islands accessible via Nanaimo include Newcastle Island, Protection Island, Gabriola Island, Valdes Island, and many other Gulf Islands. Nanaimo is also the headquarters of the Regional District of Nanaimo.
  13. Day 13 Vancouver, Canada

    After breakfast, disembark Silver Explorer and transfer to the airport, or stay on to explore more of British Columbia and the Pacific Northwest.

Silver Explorer

The purpose-built Silver Explorer expedition cruise ship has been designed specifically for navigating waters in some of the world’s most remote destinations, including both of earth’s polar regions. A strengthened hull with a Lloyd’s Register ice-class notation (1A) for passenger vessels enables Silver Explorer to safely push through ice floes with ease. A fleet of Zodiac boats allows guests to visit even the most off-the-beaten path locations and an expert Expedition Team provides insight and understanding to each unforgettable Silver Explorer luxury cruise adventure.

Fast Facts

  • Officers: International
  • Length: 354 ft
  • Beam: 52 ft
  • Tonnage: 6072 t
  • Cruise Speed: 14 knots
  • Total Staff: 117
  • Passenger Capacity: 132

 

PUBLIC AREAS:

Beauty Salon

A full range of salon services is available for both men and women including hairstyling, manicures and pedicures. Appointments for these chargeable services may be made on board the ship, or in advance via My Voyage.

Boutiques

Featuring designer collections and duty-free shopping, the onboard Boutiques offer a selection of jewellery, fashions, perfumes and Silversea logo items. Shops are closed while in port and on occasion due to local government regulations. Toiletries and convenience items are also available for purchase.

Connoisseur’s Corner

The Connoisseur’s Corner offers exceptional cognacs along with a premium selection of cigars for purchase.

Fitness Center

The Fitness Center is open daily and offers a treadmill, elliptical trainer, stationary bike and a weight machine.

Internet Café

Email friends and family back home or surf the web for a nominal fee. CD burners, headphones, digital camera media readers, and complimentary black and white laser printing are also available.

Launderette

Complimentary self-service laundry facilities are available onboard.

Library

The Library has an extensive selection of hardcover books, magazines, reference materials and newspapers, as well as audio listening stations. Movies are also available and can be viewed on your in-suite entertainment center.

Observation Lounge

Located on Deck 6 high atop the ship, the Observation Lounge offers panoramic views. Here you will find comfortable seats to enjoy a beverage and watch the ever-changing view.

Outdoor Grill and Whirl Pool

Alfresco dining in the soft ocean breeze. Menu options include healthy CruiseLite selections, fresh-from-the-oven pizza and lighter fare.

Panorama Lounge

The Panorama Lounge is specially designed to provide an uninterrupted view of the day’s destination from the comfort of the ship’s interior. This is an ideal place to unwind, listen to the pianist and enjoy a nightcap with new friends.

Reception

This central lobby area welcomes guests to speak with a Guest Relations specialist should they have a question or require any service. Assistance is available 24 hours a day.

The Restaurant

Sparkling with silver, crystal and candlelight, The Restaurant encircles its guests with sophisticated elegance and impeccable service.

The Spa at Silversea

Relax your body and mind with a wide range of soothing therapies including facials, body wraps and massages. Sauna and steam rooms are perfect for relaxing before your spa treatment or after a long nature hike. Appointments for chargeable services may be made on board the ship, or in advance via My Voyage.

The Theater

Gather in The Theater to hear fascinating tales of adventure or to learn about the region’s endemic wildlife and remarkable nature. Lectures and seminars are presented by knowledgeable experts in a variety of scientific fields.

CABINS:

All suites feature:
• Butler service
• Champagne upon request
• Refrigerator and bar setup stocked with your preferences
• European bath amenities
• Fine pratesi bed linens and down duvets
• Premium mattresses
• A choice of nine pillow types
• ipod docking station
• Plush robes and slippers
• Personalized stationery
• Umbrella
• Hair dryer
• Wifi internet access (fee applies)
• Daily suite service with nightly turndown

  1. ADVENTURER SUITE - Starts at $8,145

    ADVENTURER SUITE 157–167 sq. ft./14 – 15 m2 with 2 portholes

    Sitting area, Twin beds or queen-sized bed, Marbled bathroom with tub/ shower combination, Writing desk, Flat screen television with interactive video, on demand movies and music, and satellite news programming, Direct-dial telephone

  2. EXPLORER SUITE - Starts at $8,595

    EXPLORER SUITE 175–190 sq. ft./16–18 m2 with view window

    Sitting area, Twin beds or queen-sized bed, Marbled bathroom with tub/ shower combination, Writing desk, Flat screen television with interactive video, on demand movies and music, and satellite news programming, Direct-dial telephone

  3. VIEW SUITE - Starts at $9,495

    VIEW SUITE 192 sq. ft./18 m2 with view window

    Sitting area, Twin beds or queen-sized bed (Veranda suites 500, 501, 512 and 513 have a fixed queen-sized bed), Triple capacity that can accommodate young children on sofa bed (View suites 310, 311, 312, 313 and Vista suites 410, 412, 415, 417), Marbled bathroom with tub/shower combination, Writing desk, Flat screen television with interactive video, on-demand movies and music, and satellite news programming, Direct-dial telephone

  4. VISTA SUITE - Starts at $9,945

    VISTA SUITE 192 sq. ft./18 m2 with large picture window providing panoramic ocean views

    Sitting area, Twin beds or queen-sized bed (Veranda suites 500, 501, 512 and 513 have a fixed queen-sized bed), Triple capacity that can accommodate young children on sofa bed (View suites 310, 311, 312, 313 and Vista suites 410, 412, 415, 417), Marbled bathroom with tub/shower combination, Writing desk, Flat screen television with interactive video, on-demand movies and music, and satellite news programming, Direct-dial telephone

  5. VERANDA SUITE - Starts at $12,375

    VERANDA SUITE 206-216 sq. ft./19-20 m2 including French Balcony
    (16 sq. ft./1.5 m2) with floor-to-ceiling glass doors

    Sitting area, Twin beds or queen-sized bed (Veranda suites 500, 501, 512 and 513 have a fixed queen-sized bed), Triple capacity that can accommodate young children on sofa bed (View suites 310, 311, 312, 313 and Vista suites 410, 412, 415, 417), Marbled bathroom with tub/shower combination, Writing desk, Flat screen television with interactive video, on-demand movies and music, and satellite news programming, Direct-dial telephone

  6. MEDALLION SUITE - Starts at $17,055

    Silver and Expedition suites can accommodate three guests.

    SILVER SUITE 422 sq. ft./39 m2 including 2 French Balconies with floor-to-ceiling glass doors (30 sq. ft./3 m2)
    EXPEDITION SUITE 388-397 sq. ft./36-37 m2 with 2 view windows or 2 large picture windows

    Living room (with convertible sofa to accommodate an additional guest), Twin beds or queen-sized bed, Marbled bathroom with full-sized bath and separate shower, Walk-in wardrobe with personal safe, Vanity table with hair dryer (Silver Suite), Writing desk, Two flat screen televisions with interactive video, on-demand movies and music, and satellite news programming, Direct-dial telephone, Laundry service (Silver Suite), Afternoon canapés upon request
    (Silver Suite), Dinner at officer’s table (Silver Suite)

  7. SILVER SUITE - Starts at $18,225

    Silver and Expedition suites can accommodate three guests.

    SILVER SUITE 422 sq. ft./39 m2 including 2 French Balconies with floor-to-ceiling glass doors (30 sq. ft./3 m2)

    Living room (with convertible sofa to accommodate an additional guest), Twin beds or queen-sized bed, Marbled bathroom with full-sized bath and separate shower, Walk-in wardrobe with personal safe, Vanity table with hair dryer (Silver Suite), Writing desk, Two flat screen televisions with interactive video, on-demand movies and music, and satellite news programming, Direct-dial telephone, Laundry service (Silver Suite), Afternoon canapés upon request
    (Silver Suite), Dinner at officer’s table (Silver Suite)

  8. GRAND SUITE - Starts at $20,565

    Grand Suite can accommodate 3 guests.

    618 sq. ft./57 m2 including veranda (86 sq. ft./8 m2)

    Teak veranda with patio furniture and floor-to-ceiling glass doors, Living room with sitting area, Twin beds or queen-sized bed, Marbled bathroom with full-sized bath and separate shower, Walk-in wardrobe with personal safe, Vanity table with hair dryer, Writing desk, Two flat screen televisions with interactive video, on-demand movies and music, and satellite news programming, Direct-dial telephone, Laundry service, Dry cleaning and pressing, Afternoon canapés upon request, Dinner at officer’s table, Four hours of internet service per suite, per voyage segment, Two hours of worldwide phone use from your suite, per voyage segment

  9. OWNER SUITE - Starts at $22,995

    Owner’s Suite can accommodate 3 guests

    728 sq. ft./67 m2 including large veranda (158 sq. ft./15 m2)

    Large teak veranda with patio furniture and floor-to-ceiling glass doors, Living room with sitting area, Twin beds or queen-sized bed, Marbled bathroom, with full-sized bath and separate shower, Walk-in wardrobe with personal safe, Vanity table with hair dryer, Writing desk, Two flat screen televisions with interactive video, on-demand movies and music, and satellite news programming, Direct-dial telephone, Laundry service, Dry cleaning and pressing, Afternoon canapés upon request, Dinner at officer’s table, Four hours of internet service per suite, per voyage segment, Two hours of worldwide phone use from your suite, per voyage segment